As a BIS major, I have two concentration areas including philosophy and psychology. The BIS program focuses on integrating two disciplines in the most effective manner.  The disciplinary map is intended to compare and contrast my two concentration areas to emphasize their disciplinary perspectives.

This week, I leaned something particularly intriguing called…
This week, in my Social Psychology class (PGS350) I leaned about something called Ingratiation.  Ingratiation is defined as “an attempt to get others to like us.”  In studying this idea, I am learning about the various psychological verbal and non-verbal behaviors people express when they are in the presence of someone they want to like them.  The one specific fact I found to be most intriguing was that people unconsciously express their liking for others through nonverbal imitation.  For example, when in the presence of someone you want to like you for whatever reason–be it they could assist you in reaching some kind of goal, offer you a higher position of status, or that they are a possible love/mating interest–you are psychologically programmed to repeat their movements.  If they cross their legs, you want to cross your legs.  If they put their hand in front of their face or mouth, you will want to do the same.  The reason I found this idea to be particularly interesting is that upon learning about this idea, I have caught myself doing it on more than a few occasions.

My discovery of this intriguing idea occurred while studying for…
My PGS 350, Social Psychology class!  I would have to say this is my most interesting class this semester.  You know, the kind you don’t have to go to but you do anyway.

I found this idea intriguing because…
The ways in which humans are so similar on a psychological level completely astounds me!  Aside from nonverbal imitation, ingratiation can be displayed through many other methods .  One of these methods demonstrates that the idiom “flattery will get you nowhere” is, on a psychological level, entirely untrue.  Flattery is, in fact, an effective way through which people get others to like them (Kenrick, Neuberg, and Cialdini 117).  In addition to flattery, ingratiation explains how useful a simple smile is in gaining approval and liking from others.  There are so many subtle conscious and unconscious things humans do to acquire the liking of others!

I would label this “intriguing idea” as a theoryconceptmethod, or other…
I would label this “intriguing idea” as a theory.  According to Google dictionary, a theory is a set of principles on which the practice of an activity is based.  As this idea is based on a more than common demonstration of specific behaviors, I would consider it to be a theory.

This intriguing idea originated with…
I’m not sure that I truly understand how to answer this leg of the prompt, but that’s not going to stop me!
While I was in lecture learning about ingratiation, me and my classmate Jeremy and I whispered about various things the professor explained.  As he elaborated on the nonverbal imitation method, Jeremy and I looked at each other, both leaning to the left side of our chairs with our right hand in front of our mouths. Well, what do you know?  I guess they’re really not making this stuff up…

I can think of at least three ways I can apply this intriguing idea…
There are going to be WAY more than three situations in my life when I will need to acquire somebody’s liking!  Becoming aware of the methods through which people subconsciously ingratiate, I am able to consciously control the impressions I give off more effectively.  I am now somewhat more educated on how to impress an interviewer, or a love interest, or a new friend.  Being aware of this practice will also allow me to be aware of other people and their interactions with me:  I can more accurately interpret liking, disliking, annoying, approval, etc.  Additionally, knowing the subtle cues of certain practices allows me to more accurately identify the practices of false flattery and false liking as well.

This intriguing idea is surprisingly similar to something I learned in another class, which was…
Okay, I’m going to generalize this idea a bit, so work with me.  Ingratiation explains one of the hundreds and thousands of things that humans have in common on a psychological and biological basis.  This collectivism of humans all thinking and operating in the same ways is the idea that has me so interested in Psychology…and Philosophy!  Philosophy, however, focuses more on the common ideological needs that people have.  For example, the need to ponder and investigate the meaning of life, the purpose of existence, the existence/lack of existence of a greater being and an objectified purpose.  As humans, it is in our ideological programming to desire an answer to the meaning of life, as well as what occurs beyond life…

If this idea were a song, it would be…
Okay, back to the psychological perspective for the song connection.  Let’s go with a classic:
I Want You to Want Me – Cheap Trick

If this idea were a food, it would be…
A pizza!  Consider the human race as a pizza.  Every slice has the same foundation, the crust!  The cheese, the toppings, the seasonings, they’re all evenly disbursed across the pizza.  Let’s relate this to our psychological needs and operations.  While every slice has a certain amount of cheese, toppings, seasoning, no two pieces are EXACTLY the same, just as no two humans are the same in every way.

If someone wanted to learn more about this idea, they could read any of the following books or articles…
Well, I first I would refer to the textbook for my PGS350 class: Social Psychology: Goals in Interaction.  It’s already cited down there.
Or just click me to learn more about ingratiation, or click on me to learn how to apply it!

Kenrick, Douglas, Steven Neuberg, and Robert Cialdini. Social Psychology Goals in Interaction. 5th. Boston: Allyn & Bacon, 2010. 117. Print.

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